Audio Tapes to CD - where?

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Kirsten Ruhl
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Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by Kirsten Ruhl » Wed Feb 08, 2012 10:08 am

I have a half dozen audio tapes which I would like to have made into CDs.
I am not interested in acquiring equipment with which to do this.
I would like to know where I can take these audio tapes for conversion.

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JerryFreilich
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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by JerryFreilich » Wed Feb 08, 2012 10:51 am

I can do them for you very easily.... e-mail me at stonefly@olypen.com

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Stephen Hart
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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by Stephen Hart » Mon Apr 16, 2012 7:06 am

I saw this on Macintouch. Might be worth checking into if someone has too much of a job to ask Jerry, or if there are other special requirements.
Mike Gooding
I followed a recent recommendation on MacInTouch to convert an old audio tape to CD. I enthusiastically recommend:
Greg Youngman Music
201 Victory Drive
Buellton, CA 93427
(805) 688-1136
http://www.gymusic.com
Greg did an outstanding job converting a 41 year old 2-track audio tape on 7 inch reel to CD. He not only converted it, but sectioned it into 8 event tracks. He was able to recover one of the most important tracks with spoken sections. There were portions that were very weak and got buried by the noise. He was able to use noise reduction to bring the signal back to a useable level.
Greg was able to bring some unique family history back to life for us. Many thanks to Greg!
If you have any vintage tapes you would like to recover from the past, I'd recommend contacting Greg. He has capabilities to convert many different types of audio tape formats. He was immediately responsive to email and followed up as the process moved along. Total turn around for me was 2 weeks. Very reasonable price too.
Thanks Greg!
"Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works."
Steve Jobs

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JerryFreilich
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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by JerryFreilich » Mon Apr 16, 2012 7:28 am

In truth, this job is very easily done and for very little money. I have reel-to-reel and cassette tape decks (no 8-tracks!!) and use an iMic ($30) to take output from the amp and feed it to a USB port. In the past I've used Spin Doctor (originally part of the Roxio Toast package... but no longer functional... but that's another story) and now use Final Vinyl on the Mac. It's a free download provided by Griffin when you buy the iMic. It's not very elegant software but it works acceptably. So all you need is a system capable of playing the vinyl record/tape/ or whatever you have, an iMic, and that free software and you can do this task very easily yourself.

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Stephen Hart
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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by Stephen Hart » Mon Apr 16, 2012 9:09 am

It was the reel-to-reel tape player I was thinking of. I've done a lot of vinyl records even bypassing the iMac and just using a stereo amp line out to the Mac's line in. And there are many USB turntables available now, some with RIAA compensation built in.

But tape's another story. Players are rare, and, at least according to discussants at Macintouch, sometimes tapes need to be "baked," or otherwise treated in some special way, as they get sticky.

I have some tapes that we might like to digitize, and I may bring one test tape over, Jerry.
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Stephen Hart
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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by Stephen Hart » Thu May 17, 2012 8:09 am

I noticed this on Macintouch today. Another entry in possible software for vinyl or tape transfer to CD.
AlpineSoft's VinylStudio 8.3.0 is an audio recording program designed for converting music from vinyl records or magnetic tape to CD or MP3 format. The software offers automatic splitting into tracks, automated click and scratch removal, filters for hiss, hum, and rumble, Internet lookup for track listings, and the ability to burn audio CDs, MP3 CDs, and DVDs. This release brings a spectral view, support for Mountain Lion, retrieval of genre tags from Discogs, a fix for a problem saving Apple Lossless files on Mac OS X 10.7.4, more hiss filter settings for greater precision, and other improvements. VinylStudio is $29.95 for Mac OS X 10.6 through 10.8 or Windows and is also available in the Mac App Store.
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JerryFreilich
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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by JerryFreilich » Fri May 18, 2012 6:09 am

I looked at the VInylStudio website and the product looks quite interesting. It is also very obviously a "port" from a Windoze product. I would be very eager to learn whether it is as good as it seems and to try it out. Hope to get to their free trial over the weekend. Also will try to look for product reviews and see what people, especially Mac people, have to say about it.

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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by JerryFreilich » Fri May 18, 2012 12:15 pm

Not the final word on this yet... but here are some reviews: http://download.cnet.com/VinylStudio/30 ... 42784.html

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Stephen Hart
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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by Stephen Hart » Fri May 18, 2012 2:36 pm

The gold standard of noise removal is the celebrated Click Repair.

For most of the albums I've done, it's not too hard to use simple software like Sound Studio. Other software besides VinylStudio will break up a long recording by finding the silence (if there is any) between tracks. I don't know how useful automatic naming would be. I haven't seen iTunes do all that well with the online databases.

I have mixed feelings about noise repair. It can't be perfect, so you probably need to dial it back quite a bit, maybe enough to remove big pops. I tend to think that if I want a perfect recording of a song, I'll buy it from iTunes or buy a CD. But I'm not trying to convert a whole library.
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JerryFreilich
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Re: Audio Tapes to CD - where?

Post by JerryFreilich » Sat May 19, 2012 9:35 am

I have two reel-to-reel tape machines and 150 reels of old precious tape so I do this stuff a lot. In my experience the most important thing in the software is the ability to quickly and easily find break points between tracks, and then break there. It sounds easy, but this can be very convoluted. Try Final Vinyl (which works OK) and you'll see what I mean. The old Spin Doctor that used to be part of Roxio Toast was very good but it no longer works (and I think I bemoaned the company's failing in earlier posts here in the Forum). The ability to make automatic breaks sounds fine and works well when you have commercially made records or tapes. But for most of my material, recorded by hand or off the radio, the automatic function is either useless or difficult to apply. I just want to be able to see the waveform, move cursors easily to break points, drag at that point to LISTEN to the segway, and then click again to make the divide. Seems easy right? But the problems have all been in the human interface arena.

Nearly all of these sound editing packages tout noise and scratch reduction but I have always found that these features introduce problems in equalization. You fix the noise but then find that the full tonal range has been modified or shortened. These effects can be subtle so I strongly recommend trying noise reduction features as an experiment and listening to the results carefully before using them routinely.

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