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Add Blockers

Posted: Mon May 29, 2017 12:36 pm
by pvhansen@tfon.com
I disabled an add blocker to watch a video some time back, and can't find where it is to re-enable it. Can anyone tell me where to find it?

What is known about 'Add Blocker Plus'? Does it work on Mac, is it safe, and is there any reason to use it instead for what is already installed (if that isn't Add Blocker Plus)

Thanks

Re: Add Blockers

Posted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 9:20 pm
by Ray Bentsen
Safari extensions are enabled in Safari > Preferences and then selecting the Extensions tab (see screenshot)

I decided to disable the ad blocking extensions after reading that they can read data (including credit card info) typed into webpages.
;)

By the way, I understand that the new mac OS 10.13 will have an option to block those annoying ads that start playing a video (and their associated audio).

Re: Add Blockers

Posted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 10:40 am
by Stephen Hart
By the way, I understand that the new mac OS 10.13 will have an option to block those annoying ads that start playing a video (and their associated audio).
Good news. It's not only ads that autoplay, but video from some websites. (Sadly, Macworld is one.)

Re: Add Blockers

Posted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 1:51 pm
by pvhansen@tfon.com
Thanks, Steve. OS 10.13 sounds interesting, what is the down side of upgrading? I am currently running OS X 10.10.1 on a 2009 iMac.

Re: Add Blockers

Posted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 2:12 pm
by Ray Bentsen
First of all, as you will notice in the new macOS 10.13 Forum, only "late" 2009 Mac models will be able to run High Sierra. But High Sierra will be FREE.

The usual downside of any OS upgrade is insuring that the third-party applications that you use will still run under the new OS. Many applications that are from small developers may never have seen an upgrade since they were first marketed many years ago. Even some big companies can be slow to upgrade their software (like Quickbooks). Then there may be third-party application upgrades that are available, but at a substantial price. The bottom line is that if you have third-party applications that you must have working, make sure that they are compatible with a new OS before installing the OS ... and that you are willing to pay for any required upgrade.

On the other hand, if you only use Apple apps, like Mail, Photos, Safari, and Contacts the upgrade should be fine.

;)

Re: Add Blockers

Posted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 2:45 pm
by Stephen Hart
According to Apple, any Mac that runs Sierra will run High Sierra. We can further hope that any app that runs in Sierra will run in High Sierra, needing only minor tweaks, if any. Apple's on a yearly upgrade path now, and that means less chance of major upsets.

Everything Ray says is true. I'd only add that every user should really have a tested, complete backup before upgrading to a new OS version. Note that Time Machine can be spot checked very easily (just enter Time Machine and restore a few files), but a complete test is more difficult. A bootable clone, as done with Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper! can be checked by merely booting using the backup drive.
I don't think there's a risk that any Apple OS update will cause harm by itself. But the update process can go wrong for a variety of reasons.